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Author: MaryCatherine Crock

Florida Statutes create the guidelines for establishing the child support obligations from one parent to the other, but what happens if the obligated parent doesn’t pay the ordered child support? 
Florida Statutes create the guidelines for establishing court ordered electronic communication between a non-timesharing parent and a child.
Child support following death
Florida Statutes create the guidelines for establishing the child support obligations from one parent to the other, but what happens if that parent pre-deceases the child reaching the age of majority?
Child support is, often, one of the most integral portions of a dissolution or paternity matter. The court is able to determine and order both temporary and permanent child support. Public policy in the State of Florida establishes that each parent has a fundamental obligation to support his or her minor child. However, what is often not common knowledge is that the law also establishes that each parent has an obligation to support his or her legally dependent child, as well. This can also extend beyond the age of eighteen (18).
The Governor has signed a bill into law which creates a rebuttable presumption that equal time-sharing is in the best interest of the child, CS/HB 1301 - Parenting and Time-Sharing of Minor Children. What does this mean?
Florida legislators have approved significant reforms to Florida’s alimony law and SB 1416 will head to the Governor's desk for signature or veto. If the bill is approved by the Governor, it would have dramatic effects on the future of alimony awards in dissolution of marriage proceedings. However, it would not have retroactive application to previous awards ordered by the courts.