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Category: Divorce & Family Law

Chapter 751 of Florida Statutes dictates the requirements for legal and temporary custody of a minor child by an extended family member. As reflected in Chapter 751, many minor children live with and are cared for by members of their extended families. However, what happens when that family member needs to take extended care of a minor child?
The Florida legislature attempted to eliminate permanent alimony three times over the past ten years. However, those bills were vetoed twice by then Governor Rick Scott and once by current Governor Ron DeSantis. For better or worse, alimony is alive and well in Florida. As it stands now, alimony in Florida is governed by a law passed in 2011, which substantially overhauled the old alimony law and many court opinions arising from it.
On June 17, 2022, the ‘Alimony Reform Bill’ that passed both chambers of the Florida legislature this past legislative session, was sent to Florida Governor DeSantis’ office for review. The Governor has until the end of this month to approve the bill and make it law, veto the bill, or if the Governor does not take action either way, it will automatically become law in Florida, effective July 1, 2022.
The goal of every good divorce lawyer is a final judgment dissolving the marriage, with the least financial and emotional impact for her client. No two divorces are exactly alike as each divorcing couple presents with a different set of facts.
After utilizing the statutory guidelines to calculate an amount of child support, there are several other factors that the court may consider before ordering a final amount. Every case is different and it is important to have an informed litigator to help you determine which additional factors may be relevant to your case when determining child support.
Child support is, often, one of the most integral portions of a dissolution or paternity matter. The court is able to determine and order both temporary and permanent child support. As a result, it is important to know what is considered in determining child support and how to navigate your case accordingly.
The short answer is yes. There are many reasons why couples  start divorce proceedings and many reasons why they change their minds and decide to give the marriage a second or even third chance.  A good divorce lawyer honors and supports those decisions.
Many co-parents are familiar with the questions raised by the summertime—like where your child will spend their break from school, who will care for them while you or your co-parent is at work, and many more. Now, COVID-19 is bringing even more questions to the table—but fortunately, your trusted Daytona Beach divorce lawyers are here to help you approach every obstacle ahead with the confidence and clarity you deserve.
Our courts may be closed to foot traffic for the time being, but the health crisis has forced us to handle cases in new ways.   Normal divorce practice involves the use of electronic filing for pleadings and email exchange of documents between the parties and their attorneys.
During a consultation, prospective clients often ask if there are any advantages to being the first one to file for divorce. Many people worry that filing first will lead the judge to believe that the filing spouse is the one “destroying” the marriage. On the other hand, some people think that filing first will give them an upper hand by putting them in control of the divorce. Neither of these notions is true. The judge does not place any weight on the first to file issue because there are many reasons leading to the breakup of a marriage. The laws of Florida are applied equally to both parties, regardless of who initiated the proceedings.